Archives For Santa Fe

 

!meow colage

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After our whirlwind tour of sites in Los Alamos and Taos, my friend Kelly suggested that Mtuseni and I check out Meow Wolf — an “immersive” art exhibit in Santa Fe. She described it as “indescribable.” I was more in the mood for traditional Southwestern flavor, but it sounded intriguing. And maybe more fun for Mtuseni, who’s not really an an art guy.

As the Buddhist saying goes, “After enlightenment, the laundry.” Only this time we reversed it. We hit up a laundromat in Santa Fe, then Mtuseni and I walked into what looked like a warehouse or empty big box store — and were immediately bombarded with vibrant colors and textures and … stuff. Meow Wolf is a maze of big and small rooms and nooks and passages with different artistic themes. You basically wander and take it all in. It really is impossible to describe… you have to see it and experience it. 

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wolf pair

The treehouse has catwalks that link to exhibits on an upper level, with views of the main room from above.

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wolf colors

Meow Wolf is pretty dark inside; it can be hard to get pictures. This is the main entry path.

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!meow mirror

This looked like a good place for an infinite nap.

 

wolf bw

This room was pretty cool. It reminded me of old Warner Brothers cartoons from the 1930s. And it was nice to get a break from mad colors everywhere.

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!meow strings

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Mtuseni and I wandered around, following our own paths. There’s no formal path or flow; you just go where your curiosity takes you. To be honest, the whole thing soon seemed a bit gimmicky to me: more Universal Studios than art. (Though kudos to the artists who did create it — it’s just not my cup of tea.) I felt very tired. I thought of just lying down somewhere and taking a nap — people would probably think it was just part of the exhibit. 

After a couple hours we escaped back into the blinding New Mexico sunlight and drove the half hour back to Kelly’s place in Los Alamos. And this is when the crash happened.

Thankfully it wasn’t a car crash. The nonstop weeks of planning and driving and touring finally caught up with me. I was sick. Tired, achey, congested, even a slight fever. I slept when we got back and emerged only for dinner. The next day Mtsueni and I went into Los Alamos so I could deal with a paperwork issue back home — no epic adventures. I was a slug in a daze.

Luckily our hosts graciously stepped up to entertain Mtuseni. Kelly’s husband Grant is very active and outdoorsy. He has lots of equipment and toys… and insisted that Mtuseni get the full experience. He even took a long spin on a $3,500 mountain bike Grant was trying out. (Thank god I was napping when Grant told Mtuseni to ride his motorcycle! And Mtuseni had the sense to say no!)

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mtu suit

Grant’s winter hiking gear. Given Mtuseni’s well-documented distaste for the cold, he’d probably wear this when it gets below 60 degrees!

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mtu board

Once he got over his shock at hanging upside-down, Mtuseni did sit-ups. A little cruel bit of showing off in front of three late 50s folks who could barely do them on a flat surface!

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We wrapped up our last night in Los Alamos sitting on the deck where we had our first burrito breakfast — this time with old school Christmas lights. We marveled at millions of stars in a clear Southwestern sky, and showed Mtuseni the Big Dipper, which can’t be seen in the Southern Hemisphere. The visit wasn’t all I’d planned, but it was a nice little slice of home life before heading back out to an endless string of hotels and restaurants. Thanks guys! 

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alamos sunset